Airlines Cancelled More Than 33,000 Flights in the USA During the First Three Weeks of January

A series of winter storms have led airlines to cancel more than 33,000 flights during the first three weeks of this year, reports AP. That’s more cancellations than in January 2013 and January 2012 combined, according to masFlight, a data and software company specializing in airline operations.

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“It’s been miserable,” said John DiScala, who runs the travel advice site JohnnyJet.com and flies around 150,000 miles each year. “There’s so few vacant seats, so when they cancel one flight, trying to get onto another flight is next to impossible.”

Another Winter Storm Grounded 3,000 Flights in the USA

Another winter storm packing snow and Arctic cold slammed the northeastern United States on Tuesday, grounding 3,000 flights, shutting down governments and schools and making travel a potential nightmare for millions.

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The storm stretched 1,000 miles between Kentucky and Massachusetts but hit especially hard along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston, creating a perilous ride home for millions of motorists.

States across the northeast declared emergencies and warned residents not to travel during the fast-moving storm, which packed a potentially lethal combination of snow and wind, backed by temperatures up to 30 degrees Fahrenheit (17 degrees Celsius) below normal.

The Later You Arrive, the Sooner You Lose Baggage

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Truth be told, this is not my story. But I’m sure you’ll find it very useful. Thus, acccording to the latest research, U.S. airlines are more punctual and less likely to lose your bag than at any time in more than two decades.

An AP reporter Scott Mayerowitz says that travelers still have to put up with packed planes, rising fees and unpredictable security lines, but they are late to fewer business meetings and are not missing as many chances to tuck their kids into bed.  Nearly 84 percent of domestic flights arrived within 15 minutes of their scheduled time in the first half of the year – the best performance since the government started keeping track in 1988. The improvement over the first six months of 2011, when 77 percent of flights were on time, is mostly the result of good weather and fewer planes in the sky because of weak demand.

Airlines are also doing a better job of handling bags. Fewer than three suitcases per 1,000 passengers were reported lost, damaged or delayed from January through June, a record low. The two areas of improvement are related: When flights are late, bags often miss their connection.